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Ice Station Housman

Ice Station Housman is a show all about the weather – what causes it, what effect it has on us puny humans, and what we can do to improve the weather and/or our reaction to it. Hosted by weather enthusiasts, Jimmy Marks and Joel Housman and ACTUAL METEOROLOGIST Becky DePodwin.
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Now displaying: 2017
Sep 8, 2017

On this week's episode, Becky, Jimmy and Joel cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath as well as Hurricane Irma, the impact the storm has had so far and what is expected to come.

Show Notes!

Becky's Irma Twitter List

Beck's Facebook Stormblog

Hurricane Harvey

LANDFALL

FLOODING

TORNADOES FROM HARVEY

HARVEY RELIEF FUND

FORECASTING

GOES-16 HAVEY IMAGERY

Hurricane Irma

TRACK

LANDFALL

GOES-16 IRMA IMAGERY:

Post Image

Image courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Astronaut Randy Bresnik took this photo of Tropical Storm Harvey from the International Space Station on Aug. 28 at 1:27 p.m. CDT.

Music

Outro music is "Muddy Water" by The Seldom Scene.

Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by Audible. You can get a free audiobook download and a 30 day free trial at audibletrial.com/icestationhousman. With over 180,000 titles to choose from, you wont have difficulty in finding something you'll enjoy. Thanks for your support. 

Jul 18, 2017

On this week's episode, our dynamic trio cover a number of topics including NASA's Juno probe flyby of Jupiter, recent flash flooding, weather twitter, a rogue ice berg, and the upcoming solar eclipse.

Music: This week's outro music was "I Feel the Earth Move Under My Feet" by Carol King.

Sponsors:  This week's episode is sponsored by Audible. You can get a free audiobook download and a 30 day free trial at audibletrial.com/icestationhousman. With over 180,000 titles to choose from, you wont have difficulty in finding something you'll enjoy. Thanks for your support.

 

Show Notes!

LARSON ICE SHELF BREAK OFF

One of the biggest icebergs in recorded history just broke loose from Antarctica

FLASH FLOODING IN ARIZONA

Arizona flash flood sweeps away family relaxing in swimming hole, killing 9

JUNO'S GREAT RED SPOT PICTURES

Juno’s Great Red Spot pics are amazing! Here are some fun facts about Jupiter’s giant storm.

UPCOMING TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE ON AUGUST 21ST, 2017

Map of totality path. 

Apr 7, 2017

This week on the show we discuss proposed budget cuts by the Trump Administration to the weather related government programs.

 

Show Notes!

 

Weather Service Employees ‘Shocked’ by Reported Budget Cuts

Quote from above article:

“It’s not a well-thought-through idea, in my opinion,” said Daniel Sobien, president of the National Weather Service Employees Organization. Though he speaks only for the relatively large weather service staff, the cuts discussed in the White House-to-agency “pass-back” documents will affect all of NOAA—“the people who make sure employees get paid, do the hiring and the paperwork, plus the satellite program, which has a direct link to weather forecasting,” he said. NWS is highly dependent on the rest of NOAA, he said.

NOAA overall is reportedly slated for a 17 percent cut, but NWS and the National Marine Fisheries Service would take a hit of just 5 percent. But that is still “hugely devastating,” Sobien said. That’s because the lack of say for managers in reshuffling discretionary spending means that “the only thing they can do is lay people off, so it’s just as bad as a 17 percent cut,” he said.”

 

Trump's Plan to Slash NOAA Budget Puts Lives, Climate Research at Risk, Scientists Say

Quote from above article:

“The National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service, which monitors weather and collects climate data, would see the largest budget cut – $513 million, or 22 percent of its funding.

Former NOAA employees say the move would put the American public in danger.

Jane Lubchenco, NOAA administrator under President Barack Obama, told weather.com the "draconian cuts" to the agency that oversees weather forecasting and funds weather and climate research would "be devastating to the economy, jobs and to the safety and livelihoods of Americans in every state."

Many of the cuts are directly relevant to NOAA’s ability to provide timely and accurate weather forecasts and warnings, now and in the future, Lubchenco said. She called the cuts to the satellite program, NWS and research program particularly worrisome, noting 90 percent of weather forecasting data comes from satellites.”

 

Notes from Katie

NOAA

$990 mil cut from budget

$83 mil for ship to do ocean surveys

$400 mil cut from Polar Follow-On: satellites schedules to launch in 2024/26 for forecasting

$100 mil cut from satellite services which could impact climate data collection

26% cut to recharting the coastlines

From the Washington Post: The programs in the crosshairs include NOAA’s Coastal Zone Management grants and Regional Coastal Resilience grants, which come to $75 million combined, according to the document; its $10 million in Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency grants; the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, an annual investment of about $23 million; and its $73 million Sea Grant program.

Regional Coastal Resilience grants, which deal more specifically with bracing communities for adverse climate and weather events. These programs “build resilience of coastal communities to the negative impacts from extreme weather events, climate hazards, and changing ocean conditions,” according to a recent NOAA presentation.

the Coastal Ecosystem Resiliency Grants, which are more focused on restoring ecosystems so they can adjust to changing conditions in a way that also benefits humans. Wetlands, when healthy, can help keep pace with sea-level rise.

Also proposed for the chopping block are several research and education initiatives that provide valuable information to help coastal communities plan for the future. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System is a group of 29 sites throughout the coastal United States — including spots along the East and West coasts, the Gulf Coast, the Great Lakes, Hawaii and Alaska — that have been set aside specifically for the study of estuarine systems, or the areas where rivers flow into the sea. The program produces scientific data on these unique ecosystems and provides training and education for local communities and policymakers on protecting and managing them.

Of similar importance is the Sea Grant program, a partnership between NOAA and universities across the nation, which supports coastal research and education. The program relies on on-the-ground agents, who help establish a “real connection” between academics and coastal communities, said Jeff Carney, an architecture professor and director of the Coastal Sustainability Studio at Louisiana State University, which houses the Louisiana Sea Grant program. These programs can be vital sources of information on everything from fisheries management to storm preparation.

EPA

$330 mil cut from Superfund Cleanups. 30% reduction

$129 mil cut from EPA enforcement to catch polluters.  33% reduction

$233 mil cut from EPA research that establishes federal health and safety guidelines 50% reduction

$482 mil cut from EPA assistance grants that go to state and tribal to clean up pesticides and toxic wastes.   40% reduction

$347 mil cut from 50 EPA programs like Energy Star and diesel engine replacement meant to reduce emissions.

From Washington Post:

proposal by the White House would slash the EPA’s budget by 31 percent — nearly one third — from its current level of $8.1 billion to $5.7 billion. It would cut 3,200 positions, or more than 20 percent of the agency’s current workforce of about 15,000.

would discontinue funding for the Clean Power Plan — the signature Obama administration effort to combat climate change by regulating carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. It would sharply reduce money for the Superfund program and cut the budget for the EPA’s prominent Office of Research and Development roughly in half, to $250 million.

It also would eliminate “more than 50 EPA programs.” Among them: the Energy Star program, which aims to improve energy efficiency and save consumers money; infrastructure assistance to Alaska Native villages and the Mexico border; a grant program that helps cities and states combat air pollution; and an office that focuses on environmental justice issues.

Article from Scientific American: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/trump-budget-cuts-funds-for-epa-by-31-percent/

Some programs at EPA would see increases. The blueprint would shift $4 million above current spending levels to state revolving funds and $20 million to the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act program. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt had said he wanted to protect those funds.

The State Department, which saw perhaps the largest cut behind EPA, is shouldering much of Trump's emphasis on nationalism. The president is fulfilling his promises to depress U.S. activity abroad by eliminating the Global Climate Change Initiative. The budget also zeros out funding for the Green Climate Fund and the Climate Investment Funds.

The White House would eliminate the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), as well as loan guarantee programs, greenhouse gas reducing technologies and advanced vehicle programs.

The Office of Science would see a $900 million cut and is meant, according to the proposal, to focus on "basic science and energy research and development."

The budget also would include $140 million to restart licensing activities for nuclear waste storage at Yucca Mountain, a thorny issue on Capitol Hill.

 

Chesapeake Bay

$73 mil to $0 Chesapeake Bay

Chesapeake Bay Program: Regional partnership that directs and conducts the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay in the United States. As a partnership, the Chesapeake Bay Program brings together members of various state, federal, academic and local watershed organizations to build and adopt policies that support Chesapeake Bay restoration. By combining the resources and unique strengths of each individual organization, the Chesapeake Bay Program is able to follow a unified plan for restoration.

Became part of the EPA in 1983

50+ partnerships involved

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) is a non-profit organization devoted to the restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay in the United States. It was founded in 1967 and has headquarters offices in Annapolis, Maryland.

Budget cut worries:

Most of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s federal money goes to states, local governments and community groups through grants. The foundation focuses on coordinating and monitoring the efforts of the six bay watershed states and the District of Columbia. Besides Virginia, these states include Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

From Capital Gazette (Maryland Newspaper) a closer look at proposed cuts for other federal departments and agencies that collaborate in the bay restoration effort makes clear that the impact on the bay would go well beyond this single onerous and inexplicable decision. As The Capital has noted, the impact will trickle down to bay cleanup efforts at the state and county levels, too.

Great Lakes

$330 mil to $0 GLRI

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative was launched in 2010 to accelerate efforts to protect and restore the largest system of fresh surface water in the world — the Great Lakes

The program, primarily administered through the EPA, has traditionally enjoyed strong bipartisan support and has standalone authorization at that funding level through 2021, meaning Congress can restore some or all funding.

Mar 7, 2017

Our first episode where all three co-hosts are in the same studio for recording! On this week's episode we discuss how the GOES-16 weather satellite is progressing, the recent severe weather outbreak in the mid-west, a check-in on the rainfall and drought in California, the weird winter we've been having, and we cover our main topic of ocean currents and how they affect the weather.

 

Show Notes!

GOES-16

MID-WEST SEVERE OUTBREAK

RAINFALL / DROUGHT CHECK-IN IN CALIFORNIA

WEIRD WINTER / LACK OF SNOW IN CHICAGO

Main Topic: Ocean Current and how they affect the weather

Jan 23, 2017

On this week's episode, Becky, Jimmy, and Joel welcome guest Steve Travis, a meteorologist for Accuweather on the show to talk about the recent storms that have impacted the west coast, and lightened California's drought conditions. Steve also talks about what his typical day is like as a weather forecaster vs. what people perceive he does.

 

 

Show Notes!

Jan 4, 2017

On this week's show Jimmy, Becky, and Joel take a walk down the memory lane of significant weather events in 2016, of which Snowzilla is the most memorable. It was also a year full of flood events, both tropical and non-tropical in nature. We take a look ahead to 2017 and how La Nina might shape the weather in the coming year. 

 

Show Notes!

Topic: The weather of 2016-year in review + La Nina

Our predictions for 2017:

  1. Jimmy says its the year of fog
  2. Becky is skeptical and wants data

Winter 2016-2017 season snowfall predictions for nearest reporting station: 

  • Joel says Dulles 42”
  • Jimmy says Dulles 36”
  • Becky says Penn State 38”

Princess Leia' Life Day Song from the Star Wars Holiday Special.

Debbie Reynolds sings "Good Mornin'" in Singing In The Rain

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